Elizabeth Starborn Logo, Empowerment, Arts, WordsThe logo of the STARBORN REVUE features the words of my theme encircling a stylized insignia, my initials EAS with the A as a star. (Thanks, Jan S., for developing the insignia!) You’ll notice that the letters that are capitalized in the theme words are also my initials. Empowerment — Arts — wordS. There are several members on the CREATIVE TEAM of the Starborn Revue. We all work (and play) together to help kids, parents, caregivers, teachers, librarians — everyone — learn how they can be empowered by the arts and by words. Scroll down to meet us all, then see you on stage!

PlayingDressUp THE WRITER: Dressing up and playing a role has always been an important part of Elizabeth Starborn‘s life. She made her stage debut as a butterfly (the one with the yellow skirt and wings) in third grade, and launched herself on the world as a soprano soloist in fourth grade, with a rendition of Jolly Old St. Nicholas. (Despite what the boys in the class said, her voice did NOT squeak on the high notes.) She now mainly contents herself with the writing side of the creative process, although she is still apt to burst into song at the most disconcerting moments. Elizabeth Starborn writes middle grade novels, mainly (although not exclusively) with a theatre or music theme. She is a passionate advocate for the importance of the arts and of arts education in the lives of children and young people. The arts can empower kids to discover all they can be — Elizabeth hopes that her writing, both this blog and her books when they are published, will help empower both boys and girls as they learn who they are in this world, and find what theatre and music can teach them about themselves. Scroll down

LADY, THEATRE CATPanther on GoldTHE THEATRE CATS: There is a long tradition of cats’ involvement in theatre. This may stem from the fact that long ago, sailors who spent the winters ashore often found employment backstage in theatres (their abilities in climbing the rigging of sailing ships came in handy when working on the catwalks high above the stage), and they would bring their ship’s cats with them. Or it could simply be due to the fact that where there are old theatres, there are bound to be mice! Here’s a link to some history about theatre cats. However the tradition began, Lady and Sir are proud to carry it on. They learn a great deal while prowling around the theatre, backstage, in the wardrobe and scenery departments, in the dressing rooms, and at the front of the house, and they are generous about sharing what they know with the theatre kittens they come into contact with.